fbpx
Connect with us

Family

Ciara opens up about how motherhood makes her feel

ROLLINGOUT.COM — She credits motherhood for making her “feel even more confident.”

Published

on

R&B Singer Ciara (Photo by Janet Mayer / Splash News)

By Rollingout.com

Singer Ciara has a 4-year-old son Future Zahir from her relationship with “The Wizrd” rapper, Future, and 21-month-old daughter Sienna with her NFL quarterback husband, Russell Wilson. She has now revealed she is more “fearless” than ever since becoming a mother of two.

She credits motherhood for making her “feel even more confident.”

Speaking in February’s issue of Vogue Arabia, Ciara said: “Being a mother of two made me feel even more confident, inspired, and fearless. Motherhood definitely gives you a new conscience.”

The “Level Up” hitmaker is set to release her highly anticipated seventh studio album and has confessed it is on of her “best works ever”, however, Ciara admitted that the best thing about her upcoming project is getting to “connect” with her fans.

She added: “I’m super excited and my vision for this project is to inject love into the world with dance. What you feel when you are on stage, fully connected to your fans, is absolutely indescribable.”

The Grammy-winning artist has graced this month’s cover of Vogue Arabia — which has been shot by the legendary fashion photographer Mariano Vivanco — and the Editor-in-Chief Manuel Arnaut admitted the star was a “refreshing surprise.”

He admitted: “Getting to know Ciara, who I’ve been listening to since I was a teenager, was a refreshing surprise. Unlike many stars of her caliber, she is an absolute pleasure to work with, proving that even with millions of fans and album sales, you can keep your feet on the ground.”

This article originally appeared in Rollingout.com
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Afro

Black Fatherhood Shines in New Animated FIim

THE AFRO — For the most part, Historically, stories about Black fathers in mainstream media often carry a misleading, yet pervasive tones of absenteeism, hyper masculinity, insensitivity, and irresponsibility, monolithic. But this week, the beauty of Black Fatherhood debuts. But this is narrative does not fairly represent the role of the Black fatherhood.

Published

on

The picture book “Hair Love” was released by Kokila Books/Penguin Random House releasing on May 14, 2019, and became a New York Times Bestseller. (Courtesy Photo)

By AFRO Staff

For the most part, Historically, stories about Black fathers in mainstream media often carry a misleading, yet pervasive tones of absenteeism, hyper masculinity, insensitivity, and irresponsibility, monolithic. But this week, the beauty of Black Fatherhood debuts. But this is narrative does not fairly represent the role of the Black fatherhood.

Hair Love is a heartfelt animated short film that centers around the relationship between an African-American father, his daughter Zuri, and the most daunting task a father could ever come across – doing his daughter’s hair. The short, a passion project from Matthew A. Cherry, will be making its theatrical debut in North America on Aug. 14.

Directed by Cherry (executive producer, “BlacKkKlansman”), Everett Downing Jr. (animator, “Up,” “WALL·E”), and Bruce W. Smith (creator, “The Proud Family,” animator, “The Princess and the Frog”), Hair Love is a collaboration with Sony Pictures Animation that was launched as a Kickstarter campaign in 2017 with a fundraising goal of $75,000. Strong support led to the campaign amassing nearly $300,000, making it the most highly-funded short film campaign in Kickstarter history.

“To see this project go from a Kickstarter campaign to the big screen is truly a dream come true,” said Cherry. “I couldn’t be more excited for ‘Hair Love’ to be playing with ‘The Angry Birds Movie 2’ in front of a wide audience and for the world to see our touching story about a Black father trying to figure out how to do his daughters hair for the very first time.”

“Hair Love” features the voice of Issa Rae (“Insecure”) as the young girl’s mother. The short is produced by Karen Rupert Toliver, Stacey Newton, Monica A. Young, Matthew A. Cherry, and Lion Forge Animation’s David Steward II and Carl Reed. Peter Ramsey (“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”) and Frank Abney (animator, “Toy Story 4”) serve as executive producers.

“This is such a special story that means so much to us,” added Ramsey, “Matthew has rallied an insanely talented group of people to get this short made, and to be able to share it with the world is a gift. We hope that audiences can feel this team’s dedication up on the big screen, we are incredibly proud of it.”

The short’s co-executive producers include Jordan Peele, Andrew Hawkins, Harrison Barnes, Yara and Keri Shahidi. The short’s associate producers include N’Dambi Gillespie, Gabrielle Union-Wade & Dwayne Wade Jr., Gabourey Sidibe, Stephanie Fredric and Claude Kelly.

Physical production of “Hair Love” has taken place at the Los Angeles-based animation studio, Six Point Harness (“Guava Island”).

The picture book “Hair Love” was released by Kokila Books/Penguin Random House releasing on May 14, 2019, and became a New York Times Bestseller.

This article originally appeared in The Afro.

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

Three Day Event Planned to Commemorate First African Landing in Virginia

NNPA NEWSWIRE — The commemoration kicks off on Friday, August 23 at 12:00 p.m. at the Hampton Roads Convention Center where Byron Pitts of ABC Nightline, and formerly of CBS Evening News and 60 Minutes, will host the African-American Political Firsts Luncheon featuring panelists Kentucky Lt. Governor Jenean Hampton; L. Douglas Wilder, former governor of Virginia; U.S. Representative Bobby Scott (VA-3), and former mayor and North Carolina State Senator Howard Lee.

Published

on

This model shows a typical ship in the early 1700s on the Middle Passage. To preserve their profits, captains and sailors tried to limit the deaths of slaves from disease, suicide, and recolts. In the grisly arithmetic of the slave trade, captains usually chose between two options: pack in as many slaves as possible and hope that most survive, or put fewer aboard, improve the conditions between decks, and hope to lose fewer to disease. (Photo: Ken Lu ? Wikimedia Commons / This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.)
This model shows a typical ship in the early 1700s on the Middle Passage. To preserve their profits, captains and sailors tried to limit the deaths of slaves from disease, suicide, and recolts. In the grisly arithmetic of the slave trade, captains usually chose between two options: pack in as many slaves as possible and hope that most survive, or put fewer aboard, improve the conditions between decks, and hope to lose fewer to disease. (Photo: Ken Lu ? Wikimedia Commons / This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.)

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

In August 1619, more than 20 Africans landed at Old Point Comfort, the present-day Fort Monroe in Hampton, Va., and were forced into labor as slaves.

That was the beginning of the slave trade in America.

This month, 400 years after that humiliating and disgraceful day, the city of Hampton will commemorate “African Landing Day.”

The three-day commemoration, which begins Aug. 23, will include a host of special guests and a variety of history tours, education programs and special exhibits.

“One of the objectives we want to achieve is to correct history,” said retired Lt. Col. Claude Vann, the Hampton 2019 Commission co-chair.

“I think history has done the African American a disservice because we have never been told what our real history was. For the folks here at Hampton, particularly, we were taught that the first African landed in Jamestown. Well, that’s incorrect,” Vann said.

The place where the first African landed was Point Comfort, described by PRI.org as as far east as you can get in Virginia— on a peninsula that extends out into the Chesapeake Bay.

To get to it, you have to cross a bridge over a moat. On the other side is the largest stone fort in America — Fort Monroe — encompassing 565 acres, according to PRI.

“The city saw the importance of this commemoration early on and they created a commission within the city for it,” said Luci Cochran, the executive director of the Hampton History Museum.

“This is a history that so many people are not aware of and we want people to understand that the landing of the first African is a thread that shaped everything.

“It shaped our country and it continues to affect our country today,” she said.

According to a news release, the commemoration kicks off on Friday, August 23 at 12:00 p.m. at the Hampton Roads Convention Center where Byron Pitts of ABC Nightline, and formerly of CBS Evening News and 60 Minutes, will host the African-American Political Firsts Luncheon featuring panelists Kentucky Lt. Governor Jenean Hampton; L. Douglas Wilder, former governor of Virginia; U.S. Representative Bobby Scott (VA-3), and former mayor and North Carolina State Senator Howard Lee.

On Saturday, at 9:30 a.m. in Continental Park, Fort Monroe, the 2019 Commemoration of the First African Landing Ceremony will include remarks from CNN political contributor Van Jones and remarks and greetings from Virginia Governor Ralph Northam; U.S. Senator Mark Warner; U.S. Senator Tim Kaine; U.S. Representative Bobby Scott(VA-3), and Dr. Joseph Green, Jr., Chair of 400 Years of African American History Federal Commission.

The ceremony will feature African drumming and the I.C. Norcom High School Choir from Portsmouth, Va.

Following the ceremony from 11:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., there will be musical performances by Cheick Hamala Diabate, a GRAMMY-nominated World Music Artist; EMA Live, a billboard chart topping gospel group, RaJazz,

2019 First African Landing Commemoration Concert, Hampton Coliseum, Common, with Sounds of Blackness,

Day of Healing and Gospel Music Festival,

The event will include a bell ringing across the United States, gospel choir performances, and a keynote speech by Michael Eric Dyson.

The event will feature a National Park Service Town Hall, libation ceremony, blessing of the land, a tribute to the ancestors with a release of 400 butterflies, and Ghanaian drumming.

“From a historian’s perspective, we hope people will take away that all of this wasn’t an accident,” said Beth Austin of the Hampton History Museum, who conducted much of the research. “It happened in a global context both in terms of the wider Atlantic world in 1619 and it had the enormous global impact. The slave trade and the practice of slavery in America impacted the New World and Africa and it’s had a very long-term and profound legacy.”

For more information about the 2019 Commemoration of the First African Landing in Hampton, Va., visit www.firstafricanlanding.com.

Stacy M. Brown

A Little About Me: I'm the co-author of Blind Faith: The Miraculous Journey of Lula Hardaway and her son, Stevie Wonder (Simon & Schuster) and Michael Jackson: The Man Behind The Mask, An Insider's Account of the King of Pop (Select Books Publishing, Inc.)

My work can often be found in the Washington Informer, Baltimore Times, Philadelphia Tribune, Pocono Record, the New York Post, and Black Press USA.
Continue Reading

Entertainment

Families and Friends Celebrate Special Occasions at Geoffrey’s Inner Circle Sunday Evening Jazz Concerts

OAKLAND POST — Every Sunday evening some patrons of Jazz and Blues celebrate special occasions– birthdays, family reunions and group parties at Geoffrey’s Inner Circle. Recently, while Monica Murphy was singing, Post Publisher Paul Cobb pho­tographed Kelvin Curry and members of the Murphy fam­ily who hail from Texas.

Published

on

l-r: 1) Kelvin Curry (Oakland artist), 2) his partner, Kathy Dorsey 3), Eric Murphy (photographer, curator, Alameda County arts commissioner and gallery ambassdor of the Joyce Gordon Gallery), 4) his brother Patrick Murphy (Oakland native visiting from Texas to celebrate his birthday, 5) Nancy Murphy (Patrick’s wife from Texas), 6) Patrick’s brother, Kista Murphy (Oakland), 7) Tyrreia Alexander, (Kista’s girlfriend), 8) his sister, Monica Murphy “ Lady Soul” (professional singer), from Richmond, CA, 9) Katrina McDonald, 10) and her husband, Carl McDonald (both also visiting from Texas). (Photo by: Paul Cobb).

By The Oakland Post

Every Sunday evening some patrons of Jazz and Blues celebrate special occasions– birthdays, family reunions and group parties at Geoffrey’s Inner Circle. Recently, while Monica Murphy was singing, Post Publisher Paul Cobb pho­tographed Kelvin Curry and members of the Murphy fam­ily who hail from Texas.

Patrick Murphy is the founder of Super EZ Forex, a financial investment group in the currency markets. He is also a relationship coach and founder of The Conflicts of Life, where he shares dating, relationship, and life chang­ing tips to thousands of people weekly through his live Face­book broadcast with his wife, Nancy. Patrick is also the au­thor of “Through the Eyes of a Failure.” Nancy Murphy is a life coach, author, trainer and educator. She is the author of the book “Conquering Rejec­tion: Loving Yourself When Others Choose to Throw You Away.”

She will be releasing her second book, “The Pros and Cons of Marriage: A Secret Guide to Know If Marriage Is Right for You.”

This article originally appeared in the Oakland Post

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

Bingeworthy TV: Stories from the Stage Makes the Case

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Stories from the Stage is a collaboration of WORLD Channel, WGBH Events and Massmouth, showcasing the communal art form of storytelling. The series reflects WORLD Channel’s commitment to bringing fresh and compelling voices to public media audiences on all platforms, while reflecting the diversity of modern America and the global community.

Published

on

Storyteller Morris Irby, the first black baseball player at Tennessee Tech University discusses the cost of being a trailblazer. (Photo: Stories from the Stage)
Storyteller Morris Irby, the first black baseball player at Tennessee Tech University discusses the cost of being a trailblazer. (Photo: Stories from the Stage)

By Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D., NNPA Newswire Culture and Entertainment Editor

It is summertime and many people are “bingeing” or “catching up” on their favorite television shows they haven’t had time to watch when they actually premiered or aired. While there are the usual suspects on HBO, Showtime, Bravo, Netflix and Starz, viewers should consider binge watching Stories from the Stage, the WORLD Channel original series that features ordinary people telling extraordinary stories, which returned with a national 24-hour binge-a-thon of episodes in June. The public television series features masterful storytellers from every walk of life, highlighting our differences and shared sense of humanity.

The latest season of Stories from the Stage includes the premiere of  Rocky Top Remembers, an episode featuring stories about Morris Irby, the first black baseball player at Tennessee Tech University who learns the cost of being a trailblazer. “Rocky Top” refers to a place in Tennessee that is rocky and tough to plant, yet is fertile ground for great storytelling. Storytellers Harrison Young and Sandy Lewis are also featured on this episode, weaving tells of pecking orders in family and following in Dad’s footsteps, which isn’t always about the workplace or football field.

Viewers can also check out the episode, Game On!, featuring former Olympian and current USA Adaptive Water Ski Team member Nick Fairall discussing the leap that forever altered his Olympic dreams and his life. Each show is hosted by award-winning humorists and storytellers Theresa Okokon and Wes Hazard.

With more than 40 episodes, the Stories from the Stage gives viewers a chance to catch up on the series dedicated to bringing real stories — whether humorous or poignant, commonplace or astonishing — to American homes. Each 30-minute episode spotlights a trio of raconteurs — some experienced, some novices — sharing short anecdotes related to the episode’s unifying theme. Love, loss, family, food, immigration and celebrations are among the topics explored in episodes including “Lost & Found,” “Welcome to the Neighborhood,” “It’s All Relative” and “Holidays: The Good, The Bad.” Although each story is unique, audiences everywhere are able to connect and relate with storytellers from a mosaic of backgrounds, ages, cultures and abilities.

Stories from the Stage is a collaboration of WORLD Channel, WGBH Events and Massmouth, showcasing the communal art form of storytelling. The series reflects WORLD Channel’s commitment to bringing fresh and compelling voices to public media audiences on all platforms, while reflecting the diversity of modern America and the global community.

“Personal stories rich in human experience and emotion can create understanding, empathy and appreciation for people very different from us,” said Liz Cheng, General Manager for WORLD Channel and co-executive producer of the series. “With Stories from the Stage we hope to prove how much we all have in common and inspire community dialogue about our differences.” Stories from the Stage is co-executive-produced by Cheng and Patricia Alvarado Núñez.

Stories from the Stage episodes, original digital content, and more can be experienced on social media platforms such as FacebookTwitter and Instagram and on the WORLD Channel website. Follow the hashtag #StoriesfromtheStage to hear every word.

This post was written by Nsenga K Burton, Ph.D., founder & editor-in-chief of The Burton Wire. An expert in intersectionality and media industries, Dr. Burton is also a professor of film and television at Emory University and co-editor of the book, Black Women’s Mental Health: Balancing Strength and Vulnerability. She is Entertainment and Culture Editor for NNPA. Follow her on Twitter @Ntellectual or @TheBurtonWire.

Nsenga K. Burton Ph.D.

Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D. is an award-winning writer, entrepreneur and professor living her best life with her daughter Kai and fur-son Mr. Miyagi. She is founder and editor-in-chief of The Burton Wire, a news blog covering news of the African Diaspora. Dr. Burton is an expert in the intersection of race, class, gender, sexuality and media related industries. An activist scholar, Nsenga has authored numerous articles on the subject and recently co-edited a book on Black Women’s Mental Health. You can see and hear her on radio, tv and new media waxing poetic about these issues. In her spare time she vacillates between fighting the power and Happy Hour. Follow her on Twitter @Ntellectual.
Continue Reading

Family

Washington Nationals Launch ‘Kids Eat Free’ Program

WASHINGTON INFORMER — The Washington Nationals on Friday launched their new “Kids Eat Free” program, which will offer free meals at every home game to fans ages 12 and under. The complimentary meal packs will include a hot dog, a choice of chips or applesauce, and a 12 oz. bottled water or soda. They will be available at dedicated Kids Eat Free concession stands, located at Section 143 near the PenFed Kids Fun Zone and Section 304 on the Gallery Level.

Published

on

(Courtesy photo/Washington Nationals)

By WI Web Staff

The Washington Nationals on Friday launched their new “Kids Eat Free” program, which will offer free meals at every home game to fans ages 12 and under.

The complimentary meal packs will include a hot dog, a choice of chips or applesauce, and a 12 oz. bottled water or soda. They will be available at dedicated Kids Eat Free concession stands, located at Section 143 near the PenFed Kids Fun Zone and Section 304 on the Gallery Level.

“We are thrilled to launch this first-of-its-kind program,” said Jake Burns, Nationals Executive Vice President, Business Operations. “The Nationals are committed to providing the best gameday experience, and the Kids Eat Free program will offer tremendous value for our fans. Attending a baseball game is a quintessential American experience. We hope that this initiative will encourage more families to come to Nationals Park and enjoy the national pastime in the nation’s capital.”

To be eligible for program, children must be registered as a Jr. Nationals Kids Club member. Fans can register free of charge through the MLB Ballpark App or by visiting nationals.com/KidsEatFree.

Current Jr. Nationals Kids Club members are not automatically enrolled in Kids Eat Free and will need to enroll separately for the program to be eligible for complimentary meals.

For more information on these programs and more, please visit:  https://www.mlb.com/nationals/ballpark/park-experiences

This post originally appeared in The Washington Informer.

Continue Reading

Birmingham Times

Mother and 7 Year-Old Daughter Encourage Girls to See Beauty; not Differences

BIRMINGHAM TIMES — Dee Edwards remembers her daughter Aubrey coming home from school one day upset that she didn’t look like her friends. The girl questioned things like the color of her skin and her hair texture and expressed feelings of wanting to be like everyone else.

Published

on

Dee (left) and Aubrey Edwards with their book "We Are Different & We Are Beautiful" (Ameera Steward, The Birmingham Times)

By Ameera Steward

Dee Edwards remembers her daughter Aubrey coming home from school one day upset that she didn’t look like her friends. The girl questioned things like the color of her skin and her hair texture and expressed feelings of wanting to be like everyone else.

Dee wanted her child and other girls of color to know that they may be different, but they’re still beautiful. Because Aubrey was in a diverse environment, Dee felt it was important to write their book “We Are Different and We Are Beautiful,” which was released in May of this year; the target audience is girls ages 4 to 7.

The book has two main characters, Aubrey, who is African American, and Hannah, who is white and one of Aubrey’s kindergarten friends.

“It was important for Aubrey and me to look at her friends and [note that] they’re different—and perfect and beautiful just the way they are,” Dee said.

“Not Alone”

The book went beyond Aubrey’s school.

“I started seeing different reality shows with little girls who looked like Aubrey, and … they were talking about the exact same thing I had to talk to Aubrey about,” said Dee. “I also saw a Facebook video in which the little girl was crying because she was different from her friend, and I just kept seeing it. … Plus, suicide rates among some little girls or little kids are starting to rise, and it’s mostly because they don’t understand that they can be different and beautiful at the same time.”

Dee wanted to let other kids and parents know, “You’re not alone with having to address this subject.”

Dee said she first started talking about differences among people when her daughter was in kindergarten. Aubrey, who attends Paine Primary School in Trussville, said she feels better knowing she can be different and beautiful simultaneously.

Dee and Aubrey, the co-author, started the book with Dee asking Aubrey questions and recognizing what made Aubrey different from some of her friends.

“I realized that getting her opinion on certain things helped me pull out what she saw as different,” Dee said.

For instance, one section of the book reads “My hair is curly, and Hannah’s hair is straight. I am glad that we are friends and we are classmates. We are different and we are beautiful.”

“Educational Twist”

The authors used several techniques to put an “educational twist” on “We Are Different and We Are Beautiful.”

The words rhyme, and there is a sight-word section that includes words children are encouraged to memorize by sight, so they can automatically recognize them. The back of the book also includes a confession, or affirmation, that parents can read with their children. In addition to the reading book, Dee and Aubrey also published an activity book, which includes coloring pages, word searches, and a section in which children can write their own confessions, as well as draw pictures of themselves and their best friends.

“I did some research and, according to stressfreekids.com, [learned that] coloring can reduce anxiety and anger and have positive effects on the brains, moods, and emotions of children and adults,” Dee said. “So, I wanted to just give kids an outlet for when … they feel overwhelmed. Parents really don’t realize that they can give [children] activities to do to help reduce anxiety.”

Building Self-Confidence

Each activity leads back to building a child’s self-confidence. For example, the word search encourages children to find words that describe themselves—words like amazing, faithful, or blessed—and that parents can use to engage the children in conversation by asking questions like “Why do you feel amazing?” “What do you do to feel amazing?”

Dee said, “We found that little girls under the age of 10 tend to enjoy [the book] the most. We wanted to start at a young age because … getting them to start loving what is different about them at a young age is going to help them with accepting other kids who are different, [as well as] help them accept themselves even if they are bullied or talked about.”

Aubrey spoke about what happened when she was bullied and how it made her feel.

“[I felt] pretty sad … because every time I go to a new school, they always bully me. They bully me first, and then we start being friends. … I kept coming to my parents and … telling them people bully me badly. … People called me fat or stupid, and I didn’t like it.”

When Aubrey feels a certain way or is crying and upset about something someone has said, her mother always reminds her of the book and tells her “… we are different and we are beautiful.”

“I tell her to go read it to remind her of who she is and that being different is beautiful,” Dee added. “It makes me feel really good that we have a resource she can turn to. It makes me feel amazing, just being able to empower her and to show her that she can use what’s been against her to work in her favor.”

More Than a Mom

The Edwards family lives in Trussville. Aubrey has two brothers, and her mother Dee co-owns DeeEdwardsOnline.com with her husband, Michael Edwards. The couple works with startups to help them build profitable and sustainable businesses, especially in the tax industry. Dee also owns several tax firms, under the name Accurate Tax Services.

Dee started her business ventures a decade ago, after being laid off. She also has published five books about business or faith, and she and her husband plan to publish more books to teach faith-based entrepreneurs how to build successful businesses God’s way. The couple runs a mentorship program called the Entrepreneur Circle. They also are in the process of building a small-business hub called The Connect, which will have conference rooms, training rooms, co-working space, a meeting lounge, and private office space rentals, as well as podcast and audio rooms.

“Relatable”

For now, the family is spending a lot of time getting the word out about “We Are Different and We Are Beautiful.”

“I think [the book] is relatable,” Dee said. “That’s the reason it was important for us to make it educational: … so teachers, principals, or officials would be more accepting of adding this to schools. That’s our next goal.”

In the meantime, the authors are spreading the book’s message across Birmingham. On May 13, Dee and Aubrey had a book signing at Off the Wall in Crestwood and a book reading at the Trussville Library on July 18.

And Aubrey is enjoying the process. Writing the book was a fun experience, she said, and it helped her not care about what people tell her.

“I just walk away,” Aubrey said, adding that she handles bullying differently: “When they bully me, I just read the book and maybe do the activities.”

Aubrey also looks at herself differently now: “I’m beautiful. I’m pretty. I’m a good girl. I’m loved.”

“We Are Different and We Are Beautiful” is available via several online retailers, including Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Books a Million (search for the book title). To learn more about Dee Edwards, visit DeeEdwardsOnline.com.

For more author stories, click one of the links below. 

Jayla Groom penned book after seeing her mom’s ‘wanted’ mugshot on Crimestoppers

Khalil Saadiq wrote book that he says “will read you”

Neena Speer’s first year in law school made her better attorney — and an author

This article originally appeared in The Birmingham Times.

Continue Reading

Like BlackPressUSA on Facebook

Advertisement

Latest News