fbpx
Connect with us

Transportation

Native Detroiter, GM Engineer Cedric Stokes Gives Back to the Cody Rouge Neighborhood

Cedric Stokes, a senior validation engineer in the Steering and Driveline section at General Motors, returns to revitalize the community where he was raised during “teamGM Cares’ Grow Cody Week.”

Published

on

For the third consecutive year, more than 500 GM employees invested their time and talent during “teamGM Cares’ Grow Cody Week” to help make the Cody Rouge neighborhood a great place to live, work and play.

Volunteers rolled up their sleeves to board up, clean and paint homes in the longstanding northwest Detroit community in one of two separate weeks of service this year.

Native Detroiter Cedric Stokes, a senior validation engineer at General Motors, reflected on his childhood and experiences in the Cody community.

“This project is very important to me since I grew up a few miles from this area. It was almost 30 years ago that I played baseball at Stein Park near Cody High School and being here brings back so many memories,” Stokes said. “My parents still live in this community and several of my friends are now teachers at Cody High School.”

GM’s involvement in the Cody Rouge neighborhood is part of a commitment to building and sustaining a more vibrant Detroit through engagement and investments that make GM’s hometown a great place to live, work and thrive.

“I’ve always wanted to work for GM. It’s good to see our company giving back to the community and understanding the importance of Detroit,” Stokes said. “The men and women of this community take pride in being a Detroit resident, and when Detroit flourishes, everyone flourishes.”

Stokes continued: “It’s not just about me achieving my goals, but it’s critical for me to make a difference in my community. GM’s presence at Cody couldn’t make me prouder.”

Stokes is no stranger to volunteerism and has consistently given back to the community through his fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Stokes also participates in a mentoring program that focuses on the development of young, African American men and has worked with both March for Babies and March of Dimes.

TeamGM Cares is committed to working with Cody Rouge residents to support their vision for a family- and child-focused environment that promotes a high quality of life.

[SUBMITTED BY GENERAL MOTORS FOR BLACKPRESSUSA.COM]

NNPAFreddie

Freddie Allen is the Editor-In-Chief of the NNPA Newswire and BlackPressUSA.com. Focused on Black people stuff, positively. You should follow Freddie on Twitter and Instagram @freddieallenjr.
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

#NNPA BlackPress

MTA Board Votes to Raise Fares and Cut Service

THE TENNESSEE TRIBUNE — Because of an $8.7 million budget shortfall, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) is raising fares and cutting 8 bus routes. Regular bus fare will increase from $1.70 to $2.  WeGo’s door to door paratransit service will increase from $3.40 to $3.70 per trip. The fare increases will go into effect August 2. Route changes will occur in late September.

Published

on

Rhonda Clark, a frequent user of WeGo’s on-demand service, reading the meeting agenda and studying the proposed changes MTA board approved last week.
Rhonda Clark, a frequent user of WeGo’s on-demand service, reading the meeting agenda and studying the proposed changes MTA board approved last week.

By Peter White

NASHVILLE, TN — Because of an $8.7 million budget shortfall, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) is raising fares and cutting 8 bus routes. Regular bus fare will increase from $1.70 to $2.  WeGo’s door to door paratransit service will increase from $3.40 to $3.70 per trip. The fare increases will go into effect August 2. Route changes will occur in late September.

Magnetic stripe change and fare cards will be in use until December 2020. WeGo will then switch to stored value fare cards which are like EBT debit cards. So-called smart media will automatically provide a two-hour transfer. Buses will still accept cash but no longer sell tickets in order to speed up boarding times.

The bottom line is that bus riders will pay more for less service. At a board meeting last week, the MTA directors decided to cut its two free downtown circular routes, and instead will ferry commuters from the Music City Star train station to a few downtown stops. The part of Route 29 which goes down Jefferson Street to TSU will be retained but cost a normal fare.

The increased fares will bring in an extra $300,000 and that will keep Sunday service on the 25 Midtown route. It will also allow expanded service on Routes 8 and 17 on 8th Avenue South. Other changes are listed at WeGo’s website: nashvillemta.org.

Music City Riders (MCR), a group of concerned Metro bus riders, are frustrated with the status quo and want more bus routes and want them to run more frequently and operate longer. They cite the need for more crosswalks and more sheltered bus stops. 

“I think it’s going to be a transit crisis. A lot of people have limited funds who are depending on the buses to get to work or hospitals,” said Kutonia Smith, MCR spokesperson.

About 100 Music City Riders rallied in front of the central bus terminal on Tuesday, June 18, and marched to City Hall in support of a substitute budget that would have raised teachers’ wages, continued certain bus routes, and extended hours of operation. The city council failed to pass that budget by one vote forcing the cutbacks to Metro’s bus service.

“We need a new mayor who’s for the Nashville workers,” Smith said. “We don’t feel like the ones who are here are for the people so they need to be replaced. They’re not for the Nashvillians who live here. They’re just for the tourists,” she said. 

“The riders union is consistently and regularly raising hell about these things, as they should. And they have been focused where they should be focused—on the council and the Mayor,” said Walter Searcy. Searcy is a MTA board member and chairs MTA’s operations and finance committee.

“The access ride community is really is bus dependent. They come out to these meetings. You can expect that they will be well-represented,” Searcy said. 

MTA’s paratransit service uses smaller buses for people with disabilities and the elderly who are picked up from their homes. About 100 people attended the MTA board meeting on Thursday, June 27 at Music City Center. About 25 bus riders took three minutes at the microphone to address the five-member MTA board.

Rhonda Clark is glad the on-demand service won’t be cancelled. “You can‘t go anywhere in this town for $2. You can’t go anywhere in this town for $4. You can sit in traffic and waste $2 in gas,” Clark said. Clark is okay with paying a bit more to get where she wants to go and back again when she wants to return. She has lived in Nashville for 23 years.

“Nashville is one three cities out of the 40 largest cities in the country that does not have a dedicated funding stream for mass transit,” Searcy said. That means MTA does a yearly dance adjusting fares and services, as well as its workforce, from its piece of Metro’s operating budget.

“Future growth requires predictable and reliable funding to sustain the services we provide to our communities. This year’s budget only further serves to highlight the need for a long-term, dedicated funding source for transit, one that relieves pressure on a Metro General Fund budget crucial to so many community priorities,” said Steve Bland, WeGo Public Transit CEO. 

This article originally appeared in The Tennessee Tribune

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

Chevy’s all-new Silverado sets the course for the next century of Chevy Trucks

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “Chevrolet’s 2019 Silverado is a grand example of precision production of a truck for this age and time. Having the Silverado at the NNPA convention shows the breadth of the creativity and productivity of General Motors, who produces trucks for our readers across the country,” said NNPA President and CEO Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr.

Published

on

“With the all-new Silverado, we’ve taken the best truck on the road and made it even better,” said Mark Reuss, General Motors executive vice president of Global Product Development, Purchasing and Supply Chain.
“With the all-new Silverado, we’ve taken the best truck on the road and made it even better,” said Mark Reuss, General Motors executive vice president of Global Product Development, Purchasing and Supply Chain.

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

During the 2019 National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) Annual Convention, member publishers, editors, writers and guests were greeted with the beauty of the 2019 Chevy Silverado stationed inside the Cincinnati Westin Hotel lobby.

The NNPA is the trade association representing African American-owned media companies throughout the country.

“Chevrolet’s 2019 Silverado is a grand example of precision production of a truck for this age and time. Having the Silverado at the NNPA convention shows the breadth of the creativity and productivity of General Motors, who produces trucks for our readers across the country,” said NNPA President and CEO Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr.

“The NNPA’s reach includes 47 million African Americans, and if any of them are in the market for a truck, there could be no better selection. The Silverado is the gold standard of trucks,” Chavis added.

Chevrolet introduced the next-generation Silverado in 2018, exactly 100 years after the brand delivered its first trucks to customers in January 1918.

Experts said the all-new Silverado sets the course for the next century of Chevy Trucks with the most functional bed of any full-size truck, weighs up to 450 pounds less for increased performance and offers a broad range of trims and engine/transmission combinations to help each customer find their ideal truck.

“With the all-new Silverado, we’ve taken the best truck on the road and made it even better,” Mark Reuss, General Motors executive vice president of Global Product Development, Purchasing and Supply Chain, said in a news release.

“It has a longer wheelbase, more passenger and cargo volume, and yet, thanks to our mixed materials strategy and mass reduction expertise, the new truck is 450 pounds lighter than the current model,” Reuss said.

The truck also comes with a larger, more functional and capable bed, the automaker said.

The bed is the defining trait of every pickup, and bed construction has long been a strength of Chevy Trucks and to improve upon that strength, the 2019 Silverado 1500 bed features a best-in-class cargo volume and it offers storage bins that fit over the wheel wells, providing for nearly seven cubic feet of lockable cargo space for short-box models, while easily accommodating a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood flat on the cargo floor.

As before, the Silverado has a roll-formed, high-strength steel bed floor.

For 2019, a higher-grade steel is used, with yield strength increased from 340 to 500 megapascals of pressure for optimal strength and mass, officials said in a news release.

The Silverado now has 12 fixed tie-downs, and their strength has doubled to 500 pounds of force before bending and it also has nine moveable tie points for even more cargo flexibility.

“Truck customers value capability and functionality above all else,” said Tim Herrick, executive chief engineer of Full-Size Trucks. “Every truck — including the luxurious High Country — is a work truck with a job to do. As such, we set out to create the best tool for the job at hand, one that makes work more productive and more enjoyable, no matter what they call ‘work,’” Herrick said.

To learn more about the Silverado, visit www.chevrolet.com.

Stacy M. Brown

A Little About Me: I'm the co-author of Blind Faith: The Miraculous Journey of Lula Hardaway and her son, Stevie Wonder (Simon & Schuster) and Michael Jackson: The Man Behind The Mask, An Insider's Account of the King of Pop (Select Books Publishing, Inc.)

My work can often be found in the Washington Informer, Baltimore Times, Philadelphia Tribune, Pocono Record, the New York Post, and Black Press USA.
Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

County Announces Plans To End Auto Deaths by 2040

THE AFRO — Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks has announced bold plans to eliminate automobile deaths by 2040. Joined by Police Chief Hank Stawinski, Alsobrooks announced the County’s plan to adopt “Vision Zero”, which is a strategy already being used in D.C. and Montgomery County, at the Takoma-Langley Crossroads Transit Center.

Published

on

Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks announced the Vision Zero plan to eliminate auto deaths by 2040. (Courtesy Photo)
Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks announced the Vision Zero plan to eliminate auto deaths by 2040. (Courtesy Photo)

By Mark F. Gray

Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks has announced bold plans to eliminate automobile deaths by 2040.

Joined by Police Chief Hank Stawinski, Alsobrooks announced the County’s plan to adopt “Vision Zero”, which is a strategy already being used in D.C. and Montgomery County, at the Takoma-Langley Crossroads Transit Center.

Vision Zero is described as a multi-national road traffic safety project that aims to achieve a highway system with no fatalities or serious injuries involving road traffic.  According to the Vision Zero website, the plan has been a success in Europe and is now gaining momentum in major American cities.

Alsobrooks has made road safety a priority since her inauguration in January.  She said that a rash of auto related deaths earlier this year led to the implementation of the new plan which approaches driver safety as a public health issue.

Prince George’s County averages 42 crashes per day and over 15,000 per year, according to data from the Maryland Highway Safety Office and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Last year, there were 99 fatal accidents throughout the County.  The tragic accidents included a crash that killed three children the December 30.

As she spoke, there were 99 pairs of shoes surrounding the podium in memory of the people who lost their lives in 2018.  However, it was an accident in Bowie earlier this year that made had the greatest impact on the County Executive and intensified her resolve towards this issue.  In early February five other children were killed in a crash in Bowie and Alsobrooks said she personally attended their funerals.

“We had 99 deaths last year, it would be our goal to have at least nine fewer deaths this year, until we get to zero,” Alsobrooks said. “I walked by each of those five caskets. I have never seen anything like that in my life, and hope never to see it again.”

“They represent to us and to their families the birthday candles that have not been blown out, the graduation diplomas that will never be received, the first bike rides without training wheels,” she added.

Vision Zero is expected to be instituted by combining the use of public education, infrastructure changes, and tighter police enforcement of current road laws.   Stawinski added that his Operation Shortstop policy will allow police to use “concerted enforcement of the speed laws” around schools in the County to prevent student-related traffic deaths also.

Prince George’s County Council Chair Todd Turner said the Council and the County Executive’s office have increased funding for the Department of Public Works and Transportation in their fiscal year budgets for the past several years. Turner said additional resources will be provided through collaboration with state highway police who patrol state roads such as Pennsylvania Avenue and Route One which are two of the County’s most dangerous thoroughfares.

However, the plans for full implementation of Vision Zero haven’t been formalized. In College Park, lower speed limits, flashing lights and a fence in the median are all designed to reduce the number of people getting struck by cars crossing the busy road and examples of how Vision Zero may work is some communities.

This article originally appeared in The Afro.

Continue Reading

Daytona Times

Embry-Riddle to replace at least 60 aircraft with Cessna Skyhawks

DAYTONA TIMES — Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University plans to replace many of its existing aircraft with at least 60 new Cessna Skyhawks from Textron Aviation Inc., as well as four new Diamond DA42-VI aircraft from Diamond Aircraft Industries.  The fleet replenishment, confirmed at EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, reflects Embry-Riddle’s continuous effort to advance aviation education in service to students by ensuring that the school’s fleet is updated on a regular basis. 

Published

on

Between now and September 2022, Embry-Riddle will purchase at least 60 new Skyhawk aircraft from Textron Aviation, Inc. (Photo Courtesy Of Textron Aviation)

By The Daytona Times

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University plans to replace many of its existing aircraft with at least 60 new Cessna Skyhawks from Textron Aviation Inc., as well as four new Diamond DA42-VI aircraft from Diamond Aircraft Industries.

The fleet replenishment, confirmed at EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, reflects Embry-Riddle’s continuous effort to advance aviation education in service to students by ensuring that the school’s fleet is updated on a regular basis.

“In keeping with Embry-Riddle’s rigorous focus on aviation safety, new aircraft for our fleet were selected following an exhaustive evaluation by a team of experts on both our Prescott, Ariz., and Daytona Beach, Fla., campuses,” said Dr. P. Barry Butler, president of Embry-Riddle.

“We are honored to extend our successful, long-term relationships with Textron Aviation and Diamond Aircraft Industries to replenish the Embry-Riddle fleet, to provide our students with a highly effective and reliable training platform that will serve them well.”

Global pilot shortage

Embry-Riddle’s fleet, encompassing both of the school’s residential campuses, currently includes more than 100 aircraft, making the school’s flight-training operation the size of a small regional airline.

In Daytona Beach and Prescott, flight students complete more than 120,000 flight hours per year.

“A global pilot shortage and the promise of high-paying careers have resulted in high demand for our flight-training programs,” Butler said.

In Daytona Beach and Prescott combined, total enrollment in the university’s residential Aeronautical Science programs leading to a bachelor’s degree for professional pilots has increased about 25 percent over the past three years, with nearly 2,000 students enrolled as of fall 2018. Demand for the fall 2019 semester is expected to reach more than 2,300 students.

1,700 Daytona students

Professor Parker Northrup, Flight Department chair on the Prescott campus, reported that his program is gearing up to serve approximately 600 students this fall. The Daytona Beach Campus Aeronautical Science program expects to serve roughly 1,700 students in September, Byrnes said.

“The decision to acquire the new Skyhawks resulted from a deliberate and inclusive review process,” Northrup said.

“Embry-Riddle chose this particular aircraft because of our zero-defect aircraft flight policy. The maintenance record of the Skyhawk is superb, and these aircraft have a track record of reliable service in a busy flight-training environment.”

High demand

In response to this high demand, Embry-Riddle — the world’s largest, most comprehensive university focusing on aviation, aerospace, engineering and related programs — is gearing up for a major replenishment and likely expansion of its fleet, based on enrollment.

Between now and September 2022, Embry-Riddle will purchase at least 60 new Skyhawk aircraft. After that, the university has the option to purchase another 10 Skyhawks per year, through 2030, based on demand for the aviation-training program.

Four new Diamond DA42-VI aircraft are also being purchased for the Prescott campus, along with two new industry-leading Frasca flight simulators.

How selected

All of the new aircraft were selected for their reliability and performance, particularly at high altitudes — an important attribute for flight-training in Prescott.

“A large committee of experts — including students, flight instructors, faculty, aviation maintenance professionals and business representatives — carefully assessed a variety of aircraft attributes before identifying the Skyhawks as the best choice for Embry-Riddle,” said Dr. Kenneth Byrnes, chair of the Daytona Beach Flight Department.

“The group ultimately concluded that these aircraft offer a safe, dependable design, they are easy to maintain, and they have an excellent operational safety record.”

Embry-Riddle and Textron Aviation affirmed their business relationship at EAA AirVenture on July 24. Embry-Riddle President P. Barry Butler was joined by Textron Aviation President and CEO Ron Draper.

Also on hand were the deans of Embry-Riddle’s Colleges of Aviation in Prescott and Daytona Beach, Drs. Timothy Holt and Alan Stolzer; Flight Department Chairs Parker Northrup and Kenneth Byrnes; and Textron Aviation’s Senior Vice President of Sales, Rob Scholl, and Vice President of Piston Sales, Chris Crow.

This article originally appeared in the Daytona Times.

Continue Reading

Animals

County urging boaters to watch out for manatees

DAYTONA TIMES — The number of manatees killed by boat strikes is on the rise in Florida. According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, 93 manatee deaths, including 10 in Volusia County, were caused by watercraft collisions from Jan. 1 through July 19. The staff of Volusia County’s Manatee Protection Program urges boaters to be on the lookout for manatees as they travel in the St. Johns River and Halifax/Indian River. When struck by boats, these slow-moving marine mammals can incur deep wounds and internal damage. 

Published

on

Florida Manatee (Photo by: Wiki Commons)

By The Daytona Times

The number of manatees killed by boat strikes is on the rise in Florida. According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, 93 manatee deaths, including 10 in Volusia County, were caused by watercraft collisions from Jan. 1 through July 19.

The staff of Volusia County’s Manatee Protection Program urges boaters to be on the lookout for manatees as they travel in the St. Johns River and Halifax/Indian River. When struck by boats, these slow-moving marine mammals can incur deep wounds and internal damage.

Because manatees are often difficult to see, Debbie Wright, Volusia County’s manatee protection program manager, urges boaters to follow these guidelines:

  • Obey posted speed limits.
  • Wear polarized sunglasses to eliminate the sun’s glare and see below the water’s surface.
  • Avoid boating over seagrass beds and shallow areas where manatees might be feeding. Be aware that manatees also use deep-water channels when traveling.
  • Look for a snout, back, tail or flipper breaking the water’s surface.
  • Watch for “manatee footprints,” swirls or flat spots on the water created by a manatee’s tail when it dives or swims.
  • Remain at least 50 feet away from a manatee when operating a powerboat.
  • If you plan to jet-ski, water-ski or participate in other high-speed watersports, choose areas that manatees cannot frequent, such as land-locked lakes or waters well offshore.
  • If you see a manatee that is sick, injured, dead or orphaned, call the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at 888-404-3922.

This article originally appeared in the Daytona Times.

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

Best Detailed Walkaround 2019 Hyundai Elantra Sport

Published

on

Best Detailed Walkaround 2019 Hyundai Elantra Sport
1.6L Turbo GDI 4 Cylinder Engine
201 HP @ 195 lbs-ft Torque
7 Speed Dual-Clutch (more…)

Continue Reading

Like BlackPressUSA on Facebook

Advertisement

Latest News