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Kids Outdoor Adventure Expo

CINCINNATI HERALD — It’s one of the largest outdoor recreation and nature education events for kids in the country, and it’s right here in Cincinnati! Great Parks presents the Kids Outdoor Adventure Expo on Friday, July 12 from 9:30 a.m.–3 p.m. at Winton Woods Harbor.

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Kids Outdoor Adventure Expo (Photo by: thecincinnatiherald.com)

By The Cincinnati Herald

It’s one of the largest outdoor recreation and nature education events for kids in the country, and it’s right here in Cincinnati! Great Parks presents the Kids Outdoor Adventure Expo on Friday, July 12 from 9:30 a.m.–3 p.m. at Winton Woods Harbor.

The 14th annual event is expected to have 4,000–5,000 attendees, including groups from the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati, Cincinnati Recreation Commission and Whole Again (a faith-based organization that serves low-income children), as well as the public.

There will be a variety of free hands-on activities offered all day, including paddling rafts on Winton Lake, a climbing wall, live animals and fishing. Exhibitors include Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati Museum Center, Ohio EPA, REI and WAVE Foundation, among others. FC Cincinnati’s mascot “Gary” the lion will be making a special visit too!

The Kids Outdoor Adventure Expo is rain or shine. Winton Woods Harbor is located across from 10245 Winton Road. Learn more at https://www.greatparks.org/calendar/special-events/kids-outdoor-adventure-expo.

This article originally appeared in the Cincinnati Herald

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Deloris Carter

    Deloris Carter

    July 9, 2019 at 1:17 pm

    Congratulations on your planned event! Break a leg!

  2. Margo Drake

    Margo Drake

    July 9, 2019 at 1:34 pm

    Great

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#NNPA BlackPress

VIDEO: Hamilton County Juvenile Judge Tracie Hunter Dragged Off to Jail — Literally

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Hunter was initially charged with committing nine felonies. After charges were dropped on all but one, she was convicted and entered into a lengthy appeals process. The state supreme court of Ohio refused to hear her appeal, sending the case back to the lower court and resulting in her ultimate sentencing.

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Former Hamilton County, Ohio Juvenile Judge Tracie Hunter is dragged from the courtroom following her sentencing for unlawful interest in a public contact, after she illegally helped her brother keep his county job by mishandling a confidential document. (Photo: YouTube)

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

Former Hamilton County, Ohio Juvenile Judge Tracie Hunter appeared overcome with emotion as she was literally dragged from a Cincinnati courtroom by a sheriff’s deputy on Monday, July 22, after she was sentenced to six months in jail for charges stemming from a controversial conviction in 2014.

A jury convicted Hunter of unlawful interest in a public contract after she was accused of helping her brother keep his county job by mishandling a confidential document.

Hunter was initially charged with committing nine felonies. After charges were dropped on all but one, she was convicted and entered into a lengthy appeals process. The state supreme court of Ohio refused to hear her appeal, sending the case back to the lower court and resulting in her ultimate sentencing.

With a courtroom packed with supporters — and many more who stood outside of the proceedings — Hamilton County Common Pleas Judge Patrick Dinkelacker dispensed Hunter’s punishment.

Prior to sentencing, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters wrote a letter asking the court to consider having Hunter undergo psychiatric evaluation based on questions he has about what he calls Hunter’s “mental condition,” according to reporting from WLWT5.

Hunter’s attorney David Singleton disagreed with the request, adding that he “couldn’t believe” Deters would ask the court to have Hunter undergo evaluation and that they plan to file a motion to dismiss the case.

With all of the support Hunter has received based on both real and perceived biases during the initial trial and appeals process, Mayor John Cranley wrote a letter to Dinkelacker asking him not to place Hunter in prison, saying that she has suffered as a result of her conviction and doesn’t appear to pose any risks to others.

Postcards were sent to Dinkelacker’s house asking for leniency in his sentencing. He read some of the postcards during the hearing.

“I violated no laws, I did not secure a public contract, I did not secure employment for my brother who worked for the court for about seven years before I was elected judge,” Hunter said.

At least one of Hunter’s supporters was arrested at the courthouse after trying to intervene when deputies attempted to take Hunter into custody.

Others shouted, “No Justice, No Peace,” and accused the court of racism.

In June, former Cincinnati State Sen. Eric Kearney had expressed to NNPA Newswire that Hunter’s incarceration was “going to be a problem” and the city would “explode. I’m telling you, black people [in Cincinnati] are not going to take [Hunter going to jail] lightly,” Kearney said. “The city is on edge.”

Kearney, Hunter and her vast number of supporters have said the process used to convict her wreaked of politics, corruption, nepotism and racism.

The jury that rendered the guilty verdict in her trial was comprised of political foes and others associated with the prosecutors and a Republican establishment that didn’t take kindly to Hunter breaking the GOP and white-male dominated stronghold to win a seat on the bench in 2010, her supporters have pointed out.

For example, one of the jurors worked for WCPO Television, a local station that has filed numerous lawsuits against Hunter.

Court documents revealed that the jury foreman contributed $500 to state Sen. Bill Seitz, the father of county jury coordinator Brad Seitz, who was responsible for compiling the panel of jurors that arrived at the guilty verdict, which required a unanimous decision from the jury.

Hunter said that the only three black jurors, none of whom had known ties to prosecutors and all of whom held out for acquittal, ultimately yielded to pressure from other jurors. The judge refused to allow defense lawyers to poll the jury after announcing the verdict.

In every American criminal trial, particularly those that end in guilty verdicts, it’s the right of attorneys to request the judge to poll all 12 jurors to ensure each is in agreement with the verdict.

“The judge refused a motion for a retrial after he refused to poll the jury, in clear violation of the law and at the request of my attorney,” Hunter told NNPA Newswire in June.

“If the judge polled the jury, it happened in a blink, but I don’t remember that happening,” Kearney said.

At the close of the trial, three jurors came forward and said that their true verdict was not guilty and “if Judge Norbert Nadel had polled the jury, they would have said so,” Hunter said.

Hunter also wanted her supporters to know that she is not suicidal.

“I want everyone to know that I don’t drink … I don’t do drugs … I have no intention of harming myself,” she said.

Stacy M. Brown

A Little About Me: I'm the co-author of Blind Faith: The Miraculous Journey of Lula Hardaway and her son, Stevie Wonder (Simon & Schuster) and Michael Jackson: The Man Behind The Mask, An Insider's Account of the King of Pop (Select Books Publishing, Inc.)

My work can often be found in the Washington Informer, Baltimore Times, Philadelphia Tribune, Pocono Record, the New York Post, and Black Press USA.
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Breast cancer is the most imperative health issue Facing African American women

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among black women, and an estimated 33,840 new cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2019. An estimated 6,540 deaths from breast cancer are expected to occur among black women in 2019.

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Black women need to demand the attention and care of health care professionals. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)
Ricki Fairley, Vice President, Sisters Network, Inc.

Ricki Fairley, Vice President, Sisters Network, Inc.

By Ricki Fairley, Vice President, Sisters Network, Inc.

Though Black women get breast cancer at a slightly lower incidence rate than white women, Black women are 42% more like to DIE of breast cancer than white women. That is an astounding number and indicative of a variety of factors, many reflecting racial disparities.

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among black women, and an estimated 33,840 new cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2019. An estimated 6,540 deaths from breast cancer are expected to occur among black women in 2019.

Women do not need to DIE from breast cancer. It can’t be prevented but early stage breast cancer (meaning it has been localized within the breast) has a 99% 5 year survival rate. Note the inequity here: the overall 5-year relative survival rate for breast cancer diagnosed is 81% for black women versus 91% for white women. And, 54% of breast cancers in black women are diagnosed at a local stage, compared to 64% in white women.

To add more fuel to the fire, Black women under age 35 get breast cancer at two times the rate of white women and DIE from breast cancer three times as often as white women.

So, what’s the problem? Why are Black women dying unnecessarily?

Higher death rates among Black women reflect the following:

  1. Black women are not taking action. While 92% of black women agree breast health is important, only 25% have recently discussed breast health with their family, friends, or colleagues. And, only 17% have taken steps to understand their risk for breast cancer.
  2. Black women lack information about the severity of breast cancer, breast cancer symptoms and the need for screening.
  3. Black women take care of others at the expense of their own health.
  4. Black Women are often at a more advanced stage upon detection.
  5. Black women may not have access to health care or health insurance so may have lower frequency of and longer intervals between mammograms.
  6. Because they may not have health insurance, Black women may not follow up on abnormal mammogram results because they can’t afford the diagnostic testing.
  7. Black women often don’t have access to the same prompt high quality treatment that white women have. They express that they are often feel disrespected by physicians and staff
  8. Black women face logistical barriers to accessing care (such as transportation issues or not being able to miss work or arrange for child care).
  9. Black women fear a cancer diagnosis.
  • Black women have the highest odds (2 times more likely) of getting Triple Negative Breast Cancer, a kind of breast cancer that often is aggressive and comes back after treatment. It has the highest mortality rate and is the only breast cancer sub-type that does not have a therapy to prevent recurrence. Note that younger women and women diagnosed at later stages are more likely to get Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

We MUST STOP THE SILENCE!

Early detection saves lives. Black women of all ages need to check their breasts monthly. We need to know what our “normal” feels like so if there is some abnormality, immediate action can be taken.

Black women need to understand the severity of this health crisis. We need to be talking about our health, our family histories, and educating all of the women in our lives.

The ongoing conversations in this country around access to affordable health insurance must include acknowledgement and action regarding the inequities for Black women.

Black women need to demand the attention and care of health care professionals.

We at Sisters Network, Inc., a sisterhood of survivors and thrivers, will continue to fight like girls and be the voice of Black women. We are committed to increasing local and national attention to the devasting impact that breast cancer has in the African American community. We are working diligently to reduce the mortality rate of breast cancer among Black women by generating awareness, garnering attention, providing access to information and resources, and supporting research efforts in the ecosystem.

ABOUT SISTERS NETWORK® INC.

Sisters Network®Inc. founded in 1994 by Karen Eubanks Jackson, 25-year and three-time Breast Cancer Survivor. SNI is the only national African American breast cancer survivorship organization in the United States and a leading voice in the fight against breast cancer in the African American community. Sisters Network is governed by an elected Board of Directors. Membership includes over 20 survivor- run affiliate chapters nationwide. To learn more about Sisters Network Inc., please visit www.sistersnetworkinc.orgor call 1-866-781-1808.

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NNPA Publishers Honor Marjorie Parham, a Living Legend of the Black Press

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Parham, who turned 101 in February, spent more than three decades as publisher of the Cincinnati Herald, which was established in 1955 and counts as the longest running African American newspaper in the city.

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Active in the Urban League, the American Red Cross and various scouting groups, Parham also was known for her work as a member of NNPA where she served on the organization’s board as treasurer.

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

The National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) honored Majorie B. Parham with the organization’s Legacy Award during its annual convention in Cincinnati on Friday, June 29.

The NNPA is a trade association that represents African American-owned newspapers and media companies in the United States.

Parham, who turned 101 in February, spent more than three decades as publisher of the Cincinnati Herald, which was established in 1955 and counts as the longest running African American newspaper in the city.

“She was a real radical,” said Dorothy Leavell, the publisher of the Chicago and Gary Crusader newspapers. “Marjorie Parham was something else and she was straight forward with her words and you didn’t have to guess what she meant … she made it very clear. She is a wonderful human being and she was a great asset to the Black Press of America,” Leavell said.

Parham was unable to attend the ceremony but was represented by the husband of her granddaughter Rhonda Spillers, and Parham was feted with proclamations and commendations from Ohio State Sen. Cecil Thomas, State Reps. Sedrick Denson and Catherine Ingram; Cincinnati City Councilman Wendell Young; and Hamilton County Commissioner Stephanie Dumas.

Former Ohio State Sen. Eric Kearney served as master of ceremonies and co-chair of the convention.

Kearney’s wife, Cincinnati Herald Publisher Jan Michele Lemon Kearney, served as the host for the annual convention which this year celebrates 192 years of the Black Press of America.

The convention’s partner and sponsors included Macy’s; AARP; Procter & Gamble; Ford; General Motors; Chevrolet; RAI American Services Company; the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; American Petroleum Institute (API); Volkswagen; MillerCoors; Fifth Third Bank; Ascension; AmeriHealth Carita; Wells Fargo; and Pfizer Rare Disease.

Born in 1918 in Clement County, Ohio, Parham graduated from Batavia High School and attended Wilberforce University, a Historically Black College, according to her bio.

Later, she took classes at the University of Cincinnati before working as a clerk for the U.S. Veterans Administration.

In 1954, Parham married Gerald Porter and one year later he founded the Cincinnati Herald.

Within six years, Parham would retire from the Veterans Administration and take over as publisher of the Dayton Tribune, which her son ran until he was drafted in the military, her bio said.

In 1963, Parham also became publisher of the Cincinnati Herald, where she became a legend and often noted for her work at the newspaper and in the community through her involvement in numerous civic organizations.

In 1982, Parham became the second African American to serve as a trustee for the University of Cincinnati, and she also chaired the board of the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce, Ohio.

Active in the Urban League, the American Red Cross and various scouting groups, Parham also was known for her work as a member of NNPA where she served on the organization’s board as treasurer.

“I know [NNPA leadership] will continue their high standards of excellence,” Denson said.

Stacy M. Brown

A Little About Me: I'm the co-author of Blind Faith: The Miraculous Journey of Lula Hardaway and her son, Stevie Wonder (Simon & Schuster) and Michael Jackson: The Man Behind The Mask, An Insider's Account of the King of Pop (Select Books Publishing, Inc.)

My work can often be found in the Washington Informer, Baltimore Times, Philadelphia Tribune, Pocono Record, the New York Post, and Black Press USA.
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Karen Carter Richards, Publisher of the Houston Forward Times, Elected as New NNPA National Chair

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Karen Carter Richards, the publisher of the Houston Forward Times, has been elected to serve as the chair of the National Newspapers Publishers Association (NNPA), the trade organization that represents African American-owned newspapers and media companies throughout the country.

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Newly-elected NNPA Chair Karen Carter Richards (pictured right) is joined by NNPA President and CEO Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. (Photo: Mark Mahoney / Dream in Color Photography / NNPA)

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

Karen Carter Richards, the publisher of the Houston Forward Times, has been elected to serve as the chair of the National Newspapers Publishers Association (NNPA), the trade organization that represents African American-owned newspapers and media companies throughout the country.

Richards, who in 2018 won the NNPA’s Publisher of the Year Award, succeeds Dorothy Leavell, publisher of the Chicago and Gary Crusader Newspapers.

“We did it!” Richards exclaimed during an NNPA Legacy Awards presentation at the Cincinnati Westin Hotel on Friday, June 28.

The organization also selected a new first- and second- vice chair, secretary, treasurer and at-large board members.

The NNPA, which is celebrating its 79th year and 192 years of the Black Press in America, held its annual convention in the Queen City with Cincinnati Herald and Dayton Defender Publisher Jan Michele Kearney and Walter L. White, Vice President of Sesh Communications hosting the weeklong event.

“I just want to thank my family for all of their support,” said Richards, a second-generation publisher who has enjoyed a long and distinguished career in journalism.

Her father, Julius P. Carter, founded the Houston Forward Times in 1960 after recognizing a need for a newspaper that was committed to covering issues and personalities routinely ignored by mainstream media.

After Julius Carter’s death, the legendary Lenora “Doll” Carter assumed responsibility for the Forward Times with Karen Carter Richards working alongside her.

Richards said she understands that being the chair comes with a lot of responsibilities and work.

After a fierce campaign, Richards said she will work to move the storied association forward, help to continue to provide Black America with critical news and information, and bridge any divides that might exist between members.

“I will win your trust,” Richards said.

“This is a new vision and I’m excited about serving. We are the Black Press, the Original Black Press and I’m so happy to serve and be the new chair of the NNPA.”

The Houston native said the importance of the Black Press should never be lost on anyone.

“We are the voice, the true voice of our people. We have recorded our history for 192 years like no other media could ever do,” she said.

“We have recorded many stories…our celebrations, our injustices and those hidden, treasured stories that came from our communities that we have always found value in. Let’s do this.”

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Art

Cincinnati Shakespeare Company Presents the 13th Annual FREE Shakespeare in the Park Tour Starts Next Week!

CINCINNATI HERALD — Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s 2019 FREE Shakespeare in the Park Tour opens next week on Friday June 21! This year’s tour has over 40 performance stops (and growing). The popular Shakespeare titles, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Macbeth will be presented. These performances are FREE and open to the public. The cast features six actors from CSC Professional Intern Company.

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Cincinnati Shakespeare Company (Photo by: cincyshakes.com)

The tour of over 40 locations runs from June 21- August 31, 2019

By The Cincinnati Herald

Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s 2019 FREE Shakespeare in the Park Tour opens next week on Friday June 21! This year’s tour has over 40 performance stops (and growing). The popular Shakespeare titles, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Macbeth will be presented. These performances are FREE and open to the public. The cast features six actors from CSC Professional Intern Company.

This year’s productions include A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM, ROMEO AND JULIET and MACBETH. Performances will be held in Walnut Hills, Madisonville, Mt. Healthy, Downtown, Price Hill, Woodlawn, Clifton and a host of other communities. For a complete list, including show titles and info on the venues, visit this page: http://cincyshakes.com/shakespeare-in-the-park/.

Admission to Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s Shakespeare in the Park Tour is free and there is no ticket or RSVP required. All performances are open to all and are general admission, open seating. Arriving early is typically recommended for best seating and lawn chairs and blankets are recommended. For questions regarding inclement weather or for details and rules regarding outside food and drink (including or excluding alcohol), please contact the individual parks and venues.

All press materials available www.cincyshakes.com/PRESS. Additional images and interviews available upon request.

This article originally appeared in the Cincinnati Herald

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Cincinnati Herald

Dayton area Morehouse graduate says billionaire’s student loan payoff a blessing

CINCINNATI HERALD — Dayton area resident Steven Geraud Anderson II, who is one of the 400 Morehouse College students who graduated Sunday in Atlanta, said he was incredulous when he heard the surprise announcement by commencement speaker and billionaire Robert F. Smith, that Smith and his family would be paying off their student debt.

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Morehouse College graduate Steven Geraud Anderson II, at far left with hand raised, of Huber Heights, Ohio, celebrates with classmates after learning that his and his classmates’ student loan debts are being eliminated by billionaire Robert F. Smith. AJC.com photo

By Dan Yount

Dayton area resident Steven Geraud Anderson II, who is one of the 400 Morehouse College students who graduated Sunday in Atlanta, said he was incredulous when he heard the surprise announcement by commencement speaker and billionaire Robert F. Smith, that Smith and his family would be paying off their student debt.

I had to look around me to see the reactions of the other graduates to confirm it was true,’’ said Anderson, a graduate of Wayne High School in Huber Heights, Ohio. “Did he really say that? It was an amazing feeling.’’

Morehouse College graduate Steven Anderson II poses for this photo at his graduation ceremony. Provided

Morehouse College graduate Steven Anderson II poses for this photo at his graduation ceremony. Provided

Anderson received college scholarship money from organizations around Dayton to help him with his college expenses, but says he “racked up” almost $180,000 in student loans before graduating cum laude as an English major Sunday. He added when he went on stage to receive his diploma, he looked Smith in the eye and thanked him as he shook his hand.

“I am most excited with the blessing from Mr. Smith,’’ he said. “This gift opened so many more doors for me in that I can now concentrate on considering my purpose, rather than worrying about how I am going to pay off my student loans. I am passionate about public service, public policy and public leadership, and I hope to have a career in those areas. All of the graduates are so grateful to God and to their families and friends who have kept them in their prayers. This was the answer to all of our prayers.’’

Anderson’s family, including father Steven Anderson of Dayton, mother Regina Anderson of Dayton and other members attended the ceremony. “They could not believe it, either, and all started jumping up and down. This affected so many people,’’ he said.

Smith, who received an honorary doctorate at the same graduation exercises, told the graduates that the only way “for us to repay him was to pay it forward,’’ Anderson said.

In his commencement address, Smith said being on the bus toward success isn’t enough. “You want to own it, you want to drive it, and you want to pick up as many people as you can along the way.”

He charged the Class of 2019 with doing its part to improve the lives of Black America. “I’m putting some fuel into your bus, “ he said. “I’m counting on you to load up that bus.’’

A statement from Morehouse College officials released Tuesday said, “We, at Morehouse College, would like to thank Vista Equity Partners founder, chairman and CEO Robert F. Smith, our honorary alumnus, for the surprise gift that he offered to the graduating class at Morehouse’s 135th Commencement ceremony. To be free from the financial burden of paying off student loans will be life-changing for the Class of 2019. Our Office of Business and Finance, as well as our Office of Enrollment Management have been working diligently to calculate the student loan debt and other details of this gift. As soon as we have a final figure, we will share it with our new graduates so that they can continue on the path to careers and top-tier graduate schools student loan debt free.”

The gift has been estimated to be worth up to $40 million.

The announcement came as a surprise to Smith’s staff and to the staff at Morehouse.

According to “Forbes’’ magazine, Robert Smith is one of the world’s 13 Black billionaires. He is chairman and CEO of Vista Equity Partners, a software and technology investment firm.

Also receiving an honorary degree Sunday was Oscar-nominated actress and activist Angela Bassett, who referenced Morehouse graduate the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.  and suggested that the Class of 2019 might emulate him, but take their own path.

This article originally appeared in the Cincinnati Herald.

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