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Charleston County Public Library Participating in Charleston County School District’s Seamless Summer Feeding Program

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — The Summer Feeding Program allows school districts to provide free summer meals to children and teens in low-income areas during the traditional summer vacation period. The program is an extension of the National School Lunch Program administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The food is provided by the CCSD’s Nutrition Services Department for distribution at seven CCPL branches, and all meals meet federal meal pattern and nutritional requirements. There is no approval process required for participants to redeem free lunch at the participating branches.

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By The Charleston Chronicle

The Charleston County Public Library (CCPL) has partnered with the Charleston County School District (CCSD) to serve free hot lunch to children this summer through its participation in the Seamless Summer Feeding Program.

The Summer Feeding Program allows school districts to provide free summer meals to children and teens in low-income areas during the traditional summer vacation period. The program is an extension of the National School Lunch Program administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The food is provided by the CCSD’s Nutrition Services Department for distribution at seven CCPL branches, and all meals meet federal meal pattern and nutritional requirements. There is no approval process required for participants to redeem free lunch at the participating branches.

CCPL will serve lunch to children and teens age 18 and younger between June 10 and Aug. 9 at seven branch locations at the following times:

John’s Island Regional: 3531 Maybank Highway, John’s Island
10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Otranto Regional: 2261 Otranto Road, Charleston

11 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Hurd/St. Andrews Regional: 1735 N. Woodmere Drive, Charleston

11:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Dorchester Road Regional: 6325 Dorchester Road, North Charleston
11:40 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.

John L. Dart: 1067 King Street, Charleston
11:50 a.m. – 12:05 p.m.

Main Library: 68 Calhoun Street, Charleston
12:20 p.m. – 12:35 p.m.

Cooper River Memorial: 3503 Rivers Avenue, Charleston
12:30 p.m. – 12:45 p.m.

*Please note, CCPL branches will not serve food on July 4 since all locations will be closed for Independence Day.

CCPL has also partnered with the Lowcountry Food Bank to provide unheated lunch or hearty snacks at the Edisto and McClellanville libraries between June 10 and Aug. 9.

Edisto: 1589 Highway 174, Edisto Island*
Monday, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
2:30 p.m.

McClellanville: 222 Baker Street, McClellanville*
Monday, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
2:30 p.m.

*Please note, these are not part of CCSD’s Summer Feeding Program.

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

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Black History

Women’s Suffrage Forged by Founding Sisters: Happy Birthday to Ida B.

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — So proclaimed Ida B. Wells-Barnett, who fearlessly shined a light with words on the abominable dark days after slavery and into the 20th century. Journalist, publisher, author, activist, and suffragist leader, Ida B.’s spirit soars. July 16 marks the 157th anniversary of her birth. Blood, sweat, and ink sealed her legacy and the future of a nation still struggling to be whole.

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Gwen McKinney (Courtesy Photo)

By Gwen McKinney

“The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press.”

So proclaimed Ida B. Wells-Barnett, who fearlessly shined a light with words on the abominable dark days after slavery and into the 20th century.

Journalist, publisher, author, activist, and suffragist leader, Ida B.’s spirit soars. July 16 marks the 157th anniversary of her birth. Blood, sweat, and ink sealed her legacy and the future of a nation still struggling to be whole.

Ida B. revered the Black press as an organizing tool. Though her newspaper The Memphis Free Speech was destroyed by racist mobs, she was never silenced. During her life, she would publish three newspapers and authored “Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases” and “The Red Record,” investigative reports that remain definitive sources on racist violence more than 100 years later.

Small in stature but huge in courage, Wells, an emancipated slave, joined a cadre of Black contemporaries – scholars, activists, and thought leaders – who pledged to change the trajectory of bondage and demand that Black women have a voice.

They defy the clichés and caricatures planted in popular culture with their searing voices. Their cadence would not be paraphrased or translated into the often quoted “Ain’t I A Woman” reprise. But forever burdened by their womanhood and Blackness, their path – then and now – is littered with obstacles.

Educator and writer Mary Church Terrell observed, “Nobody wants to know a colored woman’s opinion about her own status [or] that of her group. When she dares express it, no matter how mild or tactful…, it is called ‘propaganda,’ or is labeled ‘controversial.’”

Poet, teacher, and Baltimore abolitionist Frances Ellen Harper was among the suffragists who pleaded the case for linked fate unity. “We are all bound up together in one great bundle of humanity,” she said. “Society cannot trample on the weakest and feeblest of its members without receiving the curse in its own soul.”

These Founding Sisters forged civil rights organizations with Black men, sororities, and service clubs with their women peers, and joined “woke” White women against lynching and disenfranchisement and for education and economic development.

It was Ida B. and a coterie of Black women publishers, writers, and teachers of the era who led the movement for universal suffrage even when Black women were shunned and excluded.

Nonetheless, women’s suffrage, deeply rooted in abolitionism, is depicted in a single dimension as the jumpstart for the white feminist/voting rights movement.

Regarded as social reformers, White suffragist – many of them supporters of abolition – confronted a fork in the road, conflicted between the “Negro question” and universal suffrage.

With passage of the 15th Amendment in 1870 granting Black men voting rights, universal suffrage would be sacrificed on the altar of patriarchy and white supremacy. Defended or oversimplified, the words of Susan B. Anthony, crowned the mother of women’s suffrage, illustrate the entrenched stranglehold of whiteness.

Though she counted abolitionist Frederick Douglas as an admired cohort, Anthony’s contradictions can only be measured today in the context of racism and exclusion.

“I would sooner cut off this right arm of mine before I would ever work for or demand the ballot for the black man and not the woman,” she said. One might conclude that she was seduced by the divide-and-conquer tactics of the male proponents of the 15th Amendment. But Anthony’s view was widely embraced by the White women’s suffrage movement.

Her friend and suffrage leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton, arguing against the 15th Amendment, protested: “It’s better to be the slave of an educated white man than of a degraded black one.”

One year away from the centennial of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote, how much ground have we gained as women and a nation? How much of the conversation about gender equality denies the overlapping impact of white nationalism, patriarchy, and privilege? Where and when do the voices of Black and Brown women enter?

But first and foremost, when do Black women get the recognition that they have earned in their unbroken march to freedom?

Our compass should be guided by that path forged by Ida B. Wells and other courageous Black women whose intersectional quest to make America stand upright changed the world.

This opening salvo embraces Suffrage. Race. Power. Spurred by my collaboration with a small collective of women that is Black-led, cross-generational, and supported by “woke” White women, we’ve named ourselves “Founding Sisters.” This space will offer regular installments that honor our Founding Sisters of the last centuries and spotlight the unfinished business of Suffrage. Race. Power.

To kick it off: Happy birthday Ida B.!

Gwen McKinney is President and Founder of McKinney & Associates Public Relations, for which she is responsible for translating the vision of “public relations with a conscience” into a sustained, bold and tested suite of communications services and activities. She is also the founder and lead collaborator for Suffrage.Race.Power.

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

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Home Telecom Partners with Berkeley County School District to Roll Out Free Internet to K-12 Student Households in Cross Schools

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — Award-winning Lowcountry technology provider Home Telecom announces the rollout of free internet to households with school-age children in the Cross community this upcoming school year. As part of their partnership with the Berkeley County School District (BCSD) who has support from Google via a grant, Home Telecom will be making network improvements that make the free service available to households with children from kindergarten through 12th grade that are attending Cross Elementary or Cross High Schools.

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Berkeley County School District (Photo by: charlestonchronicle.net)

By The Charleston Chronicle

Award-winning Lowcountry technology provider Home Telecom announces the rollout of free internet to households with school-age children in the Cross community this upcoming school year. As part of their partnership with the Berkeley County School District (BCSD) who has support from Google via a grant, Home Telecom will be making network improvements that make the free service available to households with children from kindergarten through 12th grade that are attending Cross Elementary or Cross High Schools.

Previously, BCSD implemented the  One Berkeley Connects initiative by supplying students in the district with Chromebooks to be used in school and at home to assist in the learning process. In order to benefit from this initiative, it is important to have reliable broadband internet access in students’ homes. Access to the internet for the betterment of education is a priority for Home Telecom.

Home Telecom began a project in late 2017 to invest a significant amount of capital into making higher speed internet available to the Cross community. Currently, only 60% of homes with school-age children in that area have internet service. Additional capital is being invested by Home Telecom to improve the internet speed available, and to provide access to at least 95% of the remaining homes without internet access.

BCSD is partnering with Home Telecom to provide greatly discounted high-speed internet service with in-home WiFi to 365 addresses identified by BCSD as being occupied by Cross school students. Funding provided by a Google grant will allow internet service to be provided to these homes at no charge for the 2019-2020 school year.

BCSD has begun notifying eligible families and requesting they contact Home Telecom to begin the process to set up the free internet service in their homes. From now through August, Home Telecom technicians will be performing necessary construction and installations to ensure these homes are internet-ready by August 2019.

Residents in the designated area with school-age children who currently have Home Telecom internet services that are slower than 10Mbps may upgrade to 10Mbps in order to take full advantage of this program. Residents who are capable and desire to have speeds higher than 10Mbps will be able to upgrade at a discounted price.

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

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Regulatory rollback on student loans takes away borrower protections

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — Every Fourth of July celebrates this nation’s founding. But this year, only a few days before the annual freedom celebration, an ill-advised governmental action will financially doom rather than free millions of student loan borrowers – as of July 1. Moreover, this action arrives as the cost of higher education continues to soar and household incomes remain largely stagnant.

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By Charlene Crowell

Every Fourth of July celebrates this nation’s founding. But this year, only a few days before the annual freedom celebration, an ill-advised governmental action will financially doom rather than free millions of student loan borrowers – as of July 1. Moreover, this action arrives as the cost of higher education continues to soar and household incomes remain largely stagnant.

Charlene Crowell

Charlene Crowell

On June 28, the Department of Education announced the end of an important student loan regulation that since 2015 has held colleges with career training programs accountable for failure to provide an education that resulted in marketable skills and earnings high enough to repay student loans.

Known as the Gainful Employment rule, it required career and technical training programs that receive federal financial aid to prove that students would receive the education promised or forfeit future federal funding dollars. Additionally, covered institutions and programs were required to disclose to prospective students the career earnings and student debts of recent graduates.

In other words, the rule was intended to rein in abusive schools before they could harm students or waste taxpayer-funded aid.

Finalized in 2014, the rule was too late to help the tens of thousands of student borrowers affected by the failures of huge for-profit institutions, Corinthian Colleges, and ITT Technical Institute.  Borrowers at these now-shuttered colleges were left without degrees, or credits that could be transferred, but carried with them unaffordable debts that have devastated the stability of their families. These closures also resulted in massive losses to taxpayers who fund federal financial aid.

Even so, the Gainful Employment rule has been effective in two other ways. First, it pushed many other for-profit institutions to cut their worst performing programs. Secondly, it controlled tuition costs. Either violation brought regulatory sanctions.

Now, instead of these protections, consumers are left on their own — directed to an expanded web resources known as a ‘College Scorecard’ where information on student debt and earnings now includes 2,100 certificate-granting programs.

“These important reforms are a more complete and effective way to hold all types of higher education institutions accountable and make sure that students have a full suite of data when making a decision about their education,” said Secretary DeVos in a statement.

Saying that information is the equivalent of regulation is simply not true. Effective regulations impose penalties, fines, and conditions on future actions – all to deter bad actors from repeating behaviors. By contrast, information only discloses with no guarantee that what is shared will be truthful, complete, or current.

Elected officials and consumer advocates were quick to point out the shortcomings of student loan deregulation.

“[B]y eliminating this rule without enforcing any alternative standard the Education Department is giving low-quality, for-profit colleges a free pass to charge high tuition for worthless credentials that leave students with insurmountable debt,” noted  U.S. Representative Bobby Scott, chairman of the House Committee on Education and Labor.

“Students need protection against unaffordable loans,” said James Kvaal, President of The Institute for College Access & Success (TICAS). “This rule rolls back the clock on those very protections. At a time when millions of borrowers are struggling with debt they cannot afford, the Department’s repeal of the gainful employment rule is reckless and irresponsible.”

The ills that TICAS’ Kvaal points out are well-documented.

A 2018 research report entitled, The State of For-Profit Colleges, by the Center for Responsible Lending (CRL) analyzed student debt on a state-by-state basis. It concluded that investing in a for-profit education is almost always a risky proposition. Undergraduate borrowing by state showed that the percentage of students that borrow from the federal government generally ranged between 40 to 60 percent for public colleges, compared to 50 to 80 percent at for-profit institutions.

CRL also found that women and Blacks suffer disparate impacts, particularly at for-profit institutions, where they are disproportionately enrolled in most states.  For example, enrollment at Mississippi’s for-profit colleges was 78 percent female and nearly 66 percent Black. Other states with high Black enrollment at for-profits included Georgia (57 percent), Louisiana (55 percent), Maryland (58 percent) and North Carolina (54 percent).

“Betsy DeVos’ decision to eliminate this important education protection is a disservice to the public and only serves to put corporate interests ahead of struggling students and taxpayers,” said Debbie Goldstein a CRL Executive Vice President, following the recent rescission of the Gainful Employment rule. “Completely removing oversight of these programs and leaving parents and students to navigate the college loan system is irresponsible and wastes federal money on programs that aren’t performing.”

Similarly to CRL, the National Consumer Law Center (NCLC) has found that for-profit college students borrow more, and more often. More than 80% of for-profit college graduates incurred nearly $40,000 in debt at the time of graduation. Further, Black and Latino student loan borrowers were found to default on their loans at twice the rate of similarly situated whites.

“Repealing the Gainful Employment rule will cost taxpayers over $6 billion over the next decade, and ending this rule will worsen the student loan debt crisis, especially for the people of color and low-income students who disproportionately attend career education programs and who are often targets of predatory recruitment practices,” said Abby Shafroth, an NCLC attorney who works with its Student Loan Borrower Assistance Project. “The Department’s unfounded claims that students will benefit from “more access” as a result of the repeal are bogus: Students don’t need access to more failing schools, they need a student loan system that doesn’t set them up to fail.”

With 44 million student borrowers owing $1.5 trillion nationwide at the end of 2019’s first quarter, removing federal guard rails against future borrower risk is as costly as it is unsustainable. As the federal government turns its back on these borrowers, perhaps another level of government can and will fill the void.

“Now more than ever,” concluded Goldstein, “states have important roles to play in regulation, oversight, and enforcement.

Charlene Crowell is the Center for Responsible Lending’s Communications Deputy Director. She can be reached at Charlene.crowell@responsiblelending.org.  

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

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Business

Charleston County Sheriff’s Office to Host Grant Writing Workshop in September

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — Charleston County Sheriff’s Office and Grant Writing USA will present a two-day grants workshop in Charleston, September 5-6, 2019. In this class you’ll learn how to find grants and write winning grant proposals. This training is applicable to grant seekers across all disciplines.

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By The Charleston Chronicle

Charleston County Sheriff’s Office and Grant Writing USA will present a two-day grants workshop in Charleston, September 5-6, 2019.

In this class you’ll learn how to find grants and write winning grant proposals. This training is applicable to grant seekers across all disciplines.

More information including learning objectives, class location, graduate testimonials and online registration is available here: http://grantstraining.com/charleston0919.

Multi-enrollment discounts and discounts for Grant Writing USA returning alumni are available. Tuition payment is not required at the time of enrollment.

Tuition is $455 and includes everything: two days of terrific instruction, workbook, and access to our Alumni Forum that’s packed full of tools, helpful discussions and more than 200 sample grant proposals

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

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COMMENTARY: Where ‘Da Heck Are Black Leaders?

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — Illegal guns and drugs are permeating black communities and destroying black men in unparalleled numbers since slavery. Is it happenstance or by design? What has led up to these murders is nothing short of orchestrated genocide. It began with a two-tier educational system and drug dealers dumping loads of guns and drugs into the black community. Fathers got hooked on drugs and abandoned their children. Mothers took on two or three low-paying jobs to make ends meet while leaving children home alone to raise themselves. How do we dig ourselves out of this systemic disingenuous mess?

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Photo by: rawpixel.com | pexels.com

By Beverly Gadson-Birch

Illegal guns and drugs are permeating black communities and destroying black men in unparalleled numbers since slavery. Is it happenstance or by design? What has led up to these murders is nothing short of orchestrated genocide. It began with a two-tier educational system and drug dealers dumping loads of guns and drugs into the black community. Fathers got hooked on drugs and abandoned their children. Mothers took on two or three low-paying jobs to make ends meet while leaving children home alone to raise themselves. How do we dig ourselves out of this systemic disingenuous mess?

Yesterday, there were three reported killings of young black men—two in North Charleston and one West Ashley—all killed within 12 hours.  Before I could wrap my hands around this widespread violence that has become commonplace in black communities, I received a call that my nephew-in-law, an ex-professional football player for the Baltimore Ravens and NY Giants, was shot four times in Charlotte, NC. Details are sketchy at this time, but he is reportedly in stable condition.

I am an old school girl. We talked things over whenever someone offended us. The biggest disagreement back in the day, that seemed to garner some attention, was at a dance if someone stepped on your shoes. The dispute ended in an apology or a shoving match. Even if there was retaliation, rarely would someone end up dead. Retaliation was little more than gathering up your boys to kick butts. And drive-by shootings were unheard of. If parents knew something was brewing, they intervened and prevented the discord from escalating. Where are the parents of these young men that are committing violent acts and terrorizing neighborhoods? Where are they? Where are our leaders? Where are the clergies? Why are you invisible? Well, so much for the good ole days when my biggest fears were rats, roaches and snakes.

The lion share of murders is happening in North Charleston and Mayor Summey has yet to take a stand against crime in his city. There are nine failing schools in Charleston County School District and eight are in North Charleston. North Charleston has two failing high schools—North Charleston and R.B. Stall High; and, two excellent rated—Academic Magnet and School of the Arts. The enrollment disparity speaks for itself.  The two failing high schools are predominately black and brown; two successful high schools, predominately white. Is there any wonder why crime is out of control in the city? Who ‘da heck cares?

The Mayor has been silent on the issue of education as well. The problem is not just a black problem. It’s a community problem. Crime has no boundaries. We are either in the boat together or all out. You either sink or swim. There is no in between. Folks don’t like to hear the truth; but the truth is all I know. I know y’all didn’t ask me, but I have to speak it like I see it. We can expect more of the same if we continue electing persons to office who don’t give a rat turd about building families and healthy communities. It’s all about fattening their nest, employing their family, awarding contracts to their friends and maintaining the status quo while the rest of us are left to deal with dark money or no money; minimum wage jobs or joblessness; minimally adequate education or failing schools; ghetto or get out; healthcare or health neglect; food desert or food bank, etc., and the disparities goes on and on and on.

White folk, y’all need to listen up. My ancestors put up with back-breaking work in cotton and tobacco fields while temperatures soared well above 100 degrees. Slavery time is over. These young black whippersnappers today ain’t gonna put up with your foolishness. Y’all ‘scuse my grammar. Y’all better own this thing and stop pretending y’all ain’t got nothing to do with this mess. It may be in the black community today, but just wait!!

We have got to desensitize young black males regarding the long and short term effects of drugs and guns. Education must begin in the home, church and school, basically in that order. It’s about reprogramming and providing opportunities for young people. It’s about redirecting resources that are being spent in white communities and redeveloping black communities, community resource and sports centers, after school and high tech programs and a first-class educational system that produces scholars and not criminals.

I still want to know: “Where ‘da heck are our black leaders? Where are our clergies?  Y’all know who you are. Come out with your hands up!!”

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

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Kimberly Riggins to continue leading Stono Park Elementary

CHARLESTON CHRONICLE — Charleston County School District announced this summer Kimberly Riggins as the principal of Stono Park Elementary School. Riggins served as the school’s interim principal for the 2018-19 school year after joining the district from Denver Public Schools. During her time in Denver, Riggins worked to improve staff and student culture and increase student attendance and parental involvement, all while creating a culture of high expectations for student learning and behavior.

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Stono Park Elementary School Principal Kimberly Riggins

By The Charleston Chronicle

Charleston County School District announced this summer Kimberly Riggins as the principal of Stono Park Elementary School. Riggins served as the school’s interim principal for the 2018-19 school year after joining the district from Denver Public Schools. During her time in Denver, Riggins worked to improve staff and student culture and increase student attendance and parental involvement, all while creating a culture of high expectations for student learning and behavior.

Riggins was instrumental in increasing K-3 reading scores and ELA and math growth scores, providing instructional feedback and professional development to staff to better enhance the quality of instructional delivery, and strategically aligning fiscal resources to meet curriculum and instructional needs. Riggins was the Executive Director of Orange County Public Charter School before serving in Denver Public Schools, leading the school to receive an A rating on the state grading system from 2012-2014.

Riggins holds a bachelor’s in business administration from the University of Cincinnati and a Master of Education from Xavier University. She is also certified as a Turnaround School Leader by the Florida Regional Education Board, a primary and elementary Montessori instructor, and holds a South Carolina principal licensure in elementary and secondary education

This article originally appeared in the Charleston Chronicle

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